Smallpox

Variola major resp. Variola vera / Variola minor

Smallpox vaccination studies

Smallpox is an acute contagious disease that was widely spread among many countries. It is caused by the Variola virus, a member of the genus orthopoxvirus (OPXV) in the family Poxviridae.

Smallpox vaccines
The eradication of smallpox is one of the greatest success stories of the World Health Organization (WHO). As defined by the WHO, smallpox was officially certified as eradicated in December 1979.

CRS is involved in further research into new Variola virus vaccines

CRS Kiel

Before its eradication, the virus spread mainly through direct and fairly prolonged face-to-face contact between people. After an incubation period of 7 to 19 days, the first symptoms appear in the form of a high fever, head and body aches, early followed by rash, pustular rash and scabs, which begin to fall off later. Before the discovery of a vaccine, epidemics left behind a wave of blindness, deformities, and death.

Variola major resp. Variola vera was the most common infection, which has caused severe illness and high mortality rates. An Infection with Variola minor was less common and has caused a less severe disease and significantly lower death rates. Despite the eradication of smallpox, there is still a need for further research into the Variola virus and to develop better-tolerated vaccines.

Despite the eradication of smallpox, there is still a need for further research into the Variola virus and to develop better-tolerated vaccines.
CRS is involved in it and has already performed a successful clinical trial to investigate the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a new smallpox vaccine.